Grammar

The Genitive Case and Possession

The genitive case is the least frequently used of the four cases, but that's no excuse to slack off. Learn how genitive nouns differ from pronoun possessors and fulfil your life's purpose of learning all the Icelandic!

The Reflexive Possessive Pronoun sinn

Learn the mysteries of the Icelandic sinn, impress your friends, woo you crush, and finally experience the nirvana-like state of understanding this confusing word!

Personal Pronouns and Possession

Learn about his and her and everything in between!

The Possessive Pronouns minn and þinn

Mine, my own, my precious! Gollum knew the importance of drawing clear boundaries around what's yours, and you should, too! Learn to use the words minn and þinn so you can tell the cops it's not your illegal substance, it's THEIRS!

U-Shift in Unstressed Syllables

I don't shift, you shift! Have you noticed how a seemingly random "u" pops up in many words and wondered what it's doing there? Well, wonder no more!

U-shift

"a" is a letter of many hats. It likes to dress up as a "u", but why? Because of u-shift, that's why!

Verb Second – V2

Who's on first? Does this article finally answer the age-old question posed by Abbot and Costello back in 1938? No, obviously not, but it helps to learn about verb second word order!

Basic Word Order

Welcome to Icelandic 101, day 1 hour 0, square one, baby's first steps. Basic word order awaits!

Comparisons

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Learn about Icelandic comparisons!

Possession and Body Parts

Quick question: are you attached to your kidneys? Learn how to explain that to Icelandic organ harvesters!

Cases and Possession

Is this car-the his John's? Icelandic possession can sound like alphabet soup gone wrong, but you can master it!

Cases and Impersonal Verbs

Verbs that don't change, dative sickness, and the language police: Impersonal verbs are an interesting topic.

Basic Word Order – V2

In Icelandic word order, everything revolves around this one principle: V2.

Cases and Prepositions

Cases are hard. We make them easier with this instalment in our series on Cases